The Masculine Faux Pas (Part III) - Fashion

Hearst Castle (CA, USA)

Hearst Castle (CA, USA)

PANTS

While dress pants should end at the top of the shoe heel, jeans can be worn to its bottom. Anything longer would be too long. In contrast, your pants should not reveal any sock when you walk. When you sit, they should not expose more than a couple inches of sock. Anything shorter would be too short.

If you do have a belt, use it, if not, buy one. Unless you’re a runway model following the orders of a designer, please stick to this basic rule and wear it.

Once you get used to wearing a belt, avoid unnecessary accessories that hang on it such as the phone holder, the camera holder, the key holder, and sometimes the torch or coffee holder!

Unless you’re a rapper – or still haven’t bought your belt –, keep the jeans on your waist as no one is interested in contemplating masculine underwear.

SOCKS

Do not wear white socks unless you’re heading to the gym for sports. The only exception would be to wear them with a white suit, but on the condition that you use fine material and not the same one you used for jogging.

Never use thick socks with suits; only wear thin and fine material.

The color of your socks should normally match the color of your pants, not your shoes. If the exact same color can’t be matched, a darker tone of the same color is acceptable. Nevertheless, the reverse is admissible when wearing jeans.

Unless you’re a nostalgic boy scout, do not wear socks with classic shorts.

SHIRTS & T-SHIRTS

Unless you’re wearing a suit – or at least a blazer -, avoid using shirts with French cuffs. When you do, do not forget to use the cuff links.

When you wear a shirt without a tie, leave a button open, or two for a sportier look. Anything more than that, keep it for the boat. 

If you insist on wearing stretch garments such as body tight T-shirts, please get in shape first. 

TIES

Your tie should reach the top of your belt buckle, no more, no less.

Keep the ties with shiny silk for special occasions; weddings are not celebrated at work.

 

Paul M. Klimos